Pioneering brake light system trialled by Ford


Ford UK is known for its excellent safety values, with the company's vehicles regularly being named as some of the safest in the world and with one model recently attaining the best Euro NCAP results ever recorded. They have reaffirmed their commitment towards further reducing road accidents with a groundbreaking new project.

The manufacturers are playing an integral part in the current Safe Intelligent Mobility – Testfield Germany (SimTD) programme, with their testing of an innovative new braking system that has been developed with the aim of alerting drivers as early as possible to potential dangers.

This pioneering system, which is described in more detail in this article, uses wireless signals to illuminate a dashboard light when the car in front brakes suddenly. Ford has volunteered its popular S-MAX model to be a key part in the testing process, with specially-equipped editions able to test car-to-car and car-to-infrastructure communications with great effectiveness, thanks to its already highly advanced in-car technology.

Discussing his company's involvement in the project, Ford's chief technical officer and vice president of their Research and Innovation centre, Paul Mascarenas, said in a statement that the group is 'committed to further real-world testing here and around the world with the goal of implementation in the foreseeable future'.

So far, 41,000 hours and approximately a million miles of testing has been dedicated to refining this potentially life saving device, which could go hand-in-hand with other new Ford technologies such as Traffic Sign Assistant and MyKey upon release.

Whether you are investing in a new Ford Fiesta, Focus, S-MAX or any other model, you can be guaranteed you're purchasing a vehicle which meets the very highest international safety standards. Although different editions of each model have different specifications, safety values are among the most important factors in the development of every Ford vehicle.   

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