General Electric add to fleet with 2,000 Ford hybrids


The popularity of Ford's environmentally friendly vehicles has been further enhanced by the news that one of the largest companies in the US, General Electric (GE), is to add 2,000 of the group's new plug-in hybrid models to its corporate fleet.

The Connecticut-based conglomerate has announced that it will be purchasing a large number of Ford C-Max Energi cars as a demonstration of its commitment to significantly lowering the emissions which are produced by its fleet and the firm as a whole, whilst the automobile manufacturers themselves have vowed to take steps to develop and market their various ‘green' products via the money that will be raised from this transaction.

One of the most exciting Ford cars for sale to have been released in the last few years, the Energi variation on the classic C-Max is one of several models to benefit from major technological advancements that the automotive experts have made in recent times; the vehicle's current specifications show that it runs for an average of 21 miles powered solely by electric, before the fuelling is taken over by a hugely efficient traditional engine that boasts an output of around 100 miles per gallon.

According to reports, the deal that has been reached amounts to the largest involving any Ford plug-in cars so far, and is sure to bode well for the company's much publicised green ambitions. Ford is known to take its responsibility of caring for the world's environment seriously, as is shown by the fact that they have agreed with GE to undertake research at the Georgia Institute of Technology to analyse the road habits of the utility firm's drivers and suggest ways in which their carbon footprint could be further reduced.

A wide range of high economy and performance vehicles of all sizes can be found at your local Ford car dealership, so be sure to consider a model from this historic manufacturer when you consider upgrading your transport to a more financially and environmentally beneficial option.

Image credit: InSapphoWeTrust (flickr.com)