Ford to unveil innovative eco-friendly interior


The Ford Motor Company is to show off its latest advancement into the world of eco-friendly technology later this month, unveiling a model with an interior made using an innovative renewable material.

Called PlantBottle, it is the same material used by Coca-Cola to create the first ever fully recyclable plastic bottle and it can be applied in any instance where conventional PET plastic is used. Following a unique partnership between the motoring giant and the famous soft drinks vendor, this great new technology will be used to create the interior of the Ford Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid.

Scientists and engineers at both firms worked tirelessly on the compound, developing a fibre using PlantBottle material which can be woven together to create vehicle-grade PET fabric. It is believed that Ford will now use the material to create seat cushions, head restraints and interior components, all of which will be shown off in a unique version of the Fusion Hybrid at next week's Los Angeles Auto Show; they are also thought to be evaluating the possibility of using the material in other areas, maximising its possibilities as a result.

With Ford currently using traditional PET to create headliners, carpet, seat fabrics and many other interior attributes of their vehicles, the environmentally friendly potential of this new technological advancement suggests many exciting years ahead for the firm.

Trialling the technology on the hybrid Fusion made perfect sense, given the already impressive eco-friendly credentials of this new Ford car. This technological advance perfectly channels the attitudes of the Fusion's drivers, creating an all-round eco-friendly driving experience rather than just a car which offers excellent fuel efficiency.

While this model is currently only available in the US, it is likely that this groundbreaking interior will become commonplace before long in new vehicles from official Ford dealerships in the UK and across Europe.

Image Credit: James Stewart (Flickr.com)