Ford opens its doors to Sync app developers


An innovative new programme launched by Ford will allow anyone who has the technical know-how to design and develop their own app, which could then be included in the automotive company's groundbreaking Sync in-car entertainment system.

Known as the Ford Developer Program, the concept is simple: anyone who thinks they have a useful concept which may interest drivers who purchase one of the latest available models from a Ford car dealership can click onto the group's website, where they will be able to find information regarding the licensing and terms of their applications, as well as the relevant coding data.

The technology experts at Ford, however, have been quick to point out that, although the programme is open to all, a rigorous selection process will mean that only the very best application proposals will be approved and eventually go forward into the cars themselves.

Ford have already specified that they are particularly interested in hearing from developers who have ideas for apps concerned with networking, music, health and productivity, and that they do not wish to include games, videos or excessively rich imagery at this stage. Those in charge of the progression of Sync have also stipulated that all submitted apps must, for safety reasons, ensure that they blank out the screen of the driver's smart phone when in use.

This announcement goes hand in hand with the news that Sync also now supports a broader range of apps than was previously the case, with the recent inclusion of popular titles such as Rhapsody and the Amazon Cloud Player.

Although used Ford cars offer excellent safety and performance records, as well as fantastic value for money, those drivers who are looking to upgrade to a new model for the new year are sure to be delighted by the extraordinary advances in technology which exist in the latest additions to the Michigan manufacturer's fleet, thanks largely to the groundbreaking Sync entertainment platform.  

Image credit: Michael Sheehan (flickr.com)