Ford keen to become market leader for in-car technologies


While the Ford Motor Company have always been renowned for their manufacturing of robust and reliable vehicles, they have more recently attracted huge praise thanks to their implementation of fantastic technologies in their latest models, such as the revolutionary SYNC system.

It seems these innovations just aren't enough for the firm, however, with a leading figure at the Ford Motor Company speaking of the company's intention to become a market leader in terms of technological advances. The statement came from Rodney Phillips, SYNC engineering manager for Ford Asia Pacific, who said that Ford needs to collaborate more closely with leading providers of mobile technology.

The aforementioned SYNC was the first sophisticated in-car technology produced by the firm, enabling drivers to benefit from the convenience of controlling their media players and mobile phones by either using the steering wheel or through intuitive voice commands. With recent estimates suggesting that 14 million vehicles could be fitted with Ford SYNC before 2015, the firm's inclination towards the creation of new technologies is completely understandable

The next innovation for the company is AppLink 2.0, allowing new Ford car owners to control even more in-car controls through the power of voice; this means that drivers can keep their eyes and hands focused on the road while easily using their Ford SYNC enabled devices. This latest endeavour could open up a fantastic new avenue for software developers, especially as more than seven million vehicles are expected to come equipped with SYNC AppLink by 2015.

Ford's long-standing love of new technology should help to create a great future for the company, with the new advances sure to make driving a new Ford Fiesta, Focus or any other model in their fleet an even more pleasurable experience in the coming years. To find out more about the superb SYNC technology, why not speak to an expert at one of the countless Ford dealerships today?

Image Credit: Ian Muttoo (Flickr.com)